(Mt) – NBS 8599 Newcastle University The Internationalization of The NBA Literature

SOLUTION AT Academic Writers Bay

Dissertation Guidelines NBS8599 Research-based Dissertation for International Business Management 2021/22 1 Table of contents Confirming the Dissertation Approach …………………………………………………………………………. 4 Module aims and learning outcomes …………………………………………………………………………… 4 Aim ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 Learning Outcomes ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 Intended Knowledge Outcomes ………………………………………………………………………….. 4 Intended Skill Outcomes …………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Key dates………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Requirements for participation in this module………………………………………………………………. 7 Staff Contacts ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 The Research Based Dissertation ……………………………………………………………………………….. 10 Dissertation topics ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Methodology, methods and data …………………………………………………………………………… 12 Ethics, risk and GDPR assessment…………………………………………………………………………… 13 Changing topics and/or methods……………………………………………………………………………. 13 Module Structure…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14 Detailed timetable …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16 Supervision …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 Supervisor allocation ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Supervisor tasks …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18 Supervision hours and content ………………………………………………………………………………. 19 Managing supervision sessions ………………………………………………………………………………. 19 What do I do if I am unhappy with the supervision I receive? ……………………………………. 20 Communication ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21 Assessment …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 Overview …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 Word count …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22 Formatting ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 23 Referencing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 23 Plagiarism……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 24 Content and structure ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 Submission ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28 Assessment criteria ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29 How Your Work is Marked …………………………………………………………………………………….. 29 2 Marking scheme ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 30 3 Confirming the Dissertation Approach Students will be asked to confirm which approach they wish to take to their dissertation, either; 1. NBS8599 Research Based Dissertation 2. NBS8600 Practice Based Dissertation The enrolment of specific students on the different dissertation modules will be done in December 2021. Once selected onto either NBS8599 or NBS8600 students cannot change to the other module. Module aims and learning outcomes Aim To provide the opportunity for students to undertake independent research in which they apply appropriate tools of analysis. This module is designed to allow the students to demonstrate their understanding of a wide range of materials covered on the programme and integrate this with the analysis of data. Students are required to: • undertake independent research to identify and explore the relevant dimensions of an international business and management topic; • review the academic literature to identify, analyse, and synthesise relevant information from multiple sources to develop a conceptual framework within which empirical or theoretical work can be evaluated; • critically evaluate and select a relevant methodology; • practically apply established techniques of research and enquiry to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline; • deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly; • produce an individual written dissertation providing information on the use of literature, research methods, findings and conclusions. Learning Outcomes Intended Knowledge Outcomes On completion of this module, students will be able to: • Demonstrate a systematic understanding and a critical awareness of current knowledge and applicable research methods at the forefront of their field of study. 4 Intended Skill Outcomes On completion of this module, students will be able to: • Demonstrate skills in critically evaluating and synthesising information across a range of international business and management academic material to apply to their own research. • Demonstrate key transferable skills, such as decision-making, data collection and analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information and written communication skills. • Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level. 5 Key dates December 2021 January/February 2022 w/c 31st January w/c 14th February 7th March w/c 21st March 12th April w/c 18th April 9th May May-June-July-August September 1st 2022 Dissertation sign-up (via an online form) Confirmation of your supervisor Preparation of first supervision meeting Dissertation briefing session First timetabled supervision session (bring task 1) Submit task 2 to supervisor for formative feedback Second timetabled supervision session Submit task 3 to supervisor for formative feedback Third timetabled supervision session Deadline for submitting your ethics, risk and GDPR forms Fourth, fifth and sixth supervision sessions (optional, to be arranged with supervisor) Submission of 10,000-word Dissertation 6 Requirements for participation in this module By studying on this module, you agree to the requirements for participation. The majority of work on this module is done by you independently. Failure to engage fully, meet deadlines and fulfil processes may cause the final dissertation mark to be reduced or may invalidate, delay, or prevent the successful completion of your dissertation. As a student, you are also solely responsible for the content of your dissertation. You must ensure that: 1. You have followed the dissertation process outlined in terms of project management (including deadlines). 2. You have followed university regulations in terms of ethics approval as well as risk assessment for your research. 3. All information that you provide is factually correct and attributed correctly to the best of your knowledge. The University is aware of a number of essay writing and dissertation writing services that are available for students to pay for. Please note that submission of work, in part or in whole, which has not been written by the individual student may be investigated as representing an assessment irregularity. Further information can be found here https://www.ncl.ac.uk/right-cite/ You MUST retain all of the material you have used in the production of your dissertation, including your electronic data files, interview notes, consent forms, questionnaires, and any other relevant material. You may be asked to produce this material. Attendance, preparation and engagement You are expected to attend all timetabled supervision sessions and to engage with the materials covered. This will maximise your opportunity to achieve the highest marks. This means that we expect you to: 1. arrive on or before the advertised time for all sessions; 2. prepare for all activities by reading and doing other preparation work as specified in advance; 3. give respect and consideration to your peers and supervisors; It is your responsibility to ensure that you catch up with anything that you will have missed. If there is anything affecting your ability to study, please follow the Personal Extenuating Circumstances (PEC) procedures and communicate with your Supervisor. It is very important that any issues are raised as soon as possible, so that we can ensure you have appropriate adjustments and support. Information can be found here https://www.ncl.ac.uk/students/progress/Regulations/Procedures/change/ We wish to establish an environment that encourages learning through: 7 1. Two-way communication that is supportive and challenging at the same time; 2. Openness in expressing views, feelings and opinion with respect for others whose views may differ; 3. Appreciation that everyone is different and that differences can lead to new perspectives on both social and intellectual interaction; 4. Constructive ways of dealing with differences without offending others; 5. Openness to give and receive honest feedback; 6. Willingness to explore ambiguity without jumping to obvious (and often incorrect) conclusions early on. Be aware, however, that the boundaries between what is and is not acceptable may vary between cultures and individuals and that you may be required to challenge your assumptions around such issues and to be open to change. Please note: Non-attendance at the timetabled supervision sessions without due notice/PEC will be followed up by the supervisor. 8 Staff Contacts Your contact for the dissertation will primarily be with your allocated supervisor. Please consider carefully who to contact about your query. Module Leader: For general queries regarding module content Dr Robin Pesch Email: [email protected] Please read this module guide and the material on Canvas very carefully to familiarise yourself with the requirements for the module. You will find the answers to most of your questions in this guide or on Canvas. Education Administrator: For queries regarding hand-in procedures, issues with Turnitin etc. Lynsey Cooper Email: [email protected] Internal email etiquette: You must use your Newcastle email address when corresponding with any member of staff; otherwise there is no guarantee that your message will be received and responded to. You can expect to receive either an automated or a personal response during working hours (Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm) within two working days. You cannot expect staff to reply to emails over weekends/on Bank Holidays. Please be mindful of the amount of emails received by staff. If your query can wait to be answered in person during a supervision session, please raise it then. Before you make contact with staff, please check that your question is not already answered in this guide or on Canvas. 9 The Research Based Dissertation Your dissertation is both: 1. A process – the opportunity for students to design and undertake a research project independently; and 2. A product – the final piece of work that documents your independent research project. Doing research is an intellectual journey in which you can apply the knowledge you have gained, use it creatively and learn more about a topic that both you and the staff are interested in. Most students find doing research very rewarding. It is your research and you choose a topic to research and produce an academic piece of work that is either based on an empirical study of a contemporary management issue or existing literature/data. The terms dissertation and research can seem quite daunting. However, most of you will have completed some sort of project during your previous studies and, in many ways, a dissertation is just an extension of individual project work. The key differences, however, are: • • • • You choose a question/problem/issue in which you are interested and/or engaged in some way; You must review the relevant academic literature in-depth; You undertake an ethics, risk and GDPR assessment of your work; and You plan and execute a methodology to gather and analyse data in response to your question/problem/issue. While research projects vary in style and approach according to the specific topic under investigation, the following represent some core principles for all dissertations: • • • You will undertake a thorough review of literature and of current knowledge; You will examine the theoretical base for your work in some way, in some practical situation; and You will demonstrate your ability to synthesise theories and to relate theory and practice in a critical manner. More specifically, dissertations should: • • Be based on empirical work undertaken by the student or a very in-depth review of current academic theoretical work; Provide an academic framework within which that work is evaluated; o Include a discussion of appropriate methodological issues; and o Arrive at a conclusion justified by the empirical and/or theoretical material. Employers are impressed by dissertation work because it shows that you can work independently, think critically, gather and analyse information and draw conclusions. 10 The dissertation forms a major part of your Masters programme, counting for 50 out of the total 180 credits of your Masters degree. Strictly speaking students are only entitled to ‘proceed’ to the dissertation once they have passed their final written examinations. However, in practice work on the dissertation begins early in the academic year. You undertake postgraduate research methods training as a preparation for the dissertation work. Dissertation topics The topic of your dissertation must fall within the broad field of International Business (IB), based on the modules you have studied throughout your course. This gives you considerable freedom to choose your topic. Your chosen topic must meet this definition of IB research adapted from the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS)1. According to the journal, IB research includes: • • • • • • The activities, strategies, structures or decision-making processes of multinational enterprises (i.e. firms that have operations in more than one country); interactions between multinational enterprises and other actors, organizations and institutions (this may include organisations such as the UN, non-profit organisations and social enterprises, as well as actors such as civil society); the cross-border activities of firms (e.g., intra-firm trade, finance, investment, technology transfers, offshore services, CSR or management of the global value chain); how the international environment (e.g., cultural, political, economic) affects the activities, strategies, structures or decision-making processes of firms (including such things as CSR, cross-cultural communications, global HRM or leadership); comparative studies of businesses, business processes and organizational behaviour and change in different countries and environments (including such things as crosscultural CSR, communications, global HRM or leadership); the international dimensions of organizational forms (e.g., strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and network organisations) and activities (e.g., entrepreneurship, knowledge-based competition, corporate governance, CSR, HRM, leadership). Ideas for topics can be gleaned from many sources – work placement experiences, current part-time work, other empirical material to which you can gain access, course work, academic reading especially current and recent issues of relevant academic journals, regular reading of business & management trade press. Your supervisor will help you finalise your approaches and designs. The particular aspect of the topic which becomes central to the dissertation may well change in one direction or another as the dissertation progresses. This evolution or ‘fine tuning’ of a topic is quite usual, should be expected and should be discussed with your supervisor. However, it is very high risk to significantly change your topic and/or methods late in the supervision process (see further details on p13). 1 http://www.palgrave-journals.com/jibs/jibs_statement.html 11 Methodology, methods and data The dissertation involves the design and execution of a research project. It is very important that you revise your NBS8327 module (Research Methods for International Business Management) as well as reading the many textbooks and journal articles available to you. Your supervisor will also help finalise your approaches and there are a variety of choices regarding methodology and methods, for example: • • • Qualitative (e.g. methods including observation, undertaking and interpreting interviews); or Quantitative (e.g. data sets such as discussed in your Research Methods module); or Mixed methods (e.g. a combination of methods including quantitative data and interviews). There is no difference in the marking of dissertations based on the type of methodology/methods selected (see marking scheme), rather the selection ought to be justified to be most appropriate to the research you aim to undertake. The data that may be gathered for analysis and interpretation may also be primary and/or secondary and, again, there is no difference in the marking of dissertations based on primary or secondary material (see marking scheme). Your dissertation may include collection and analysis of one or more of the following example types of empirical materials: Primary material • The results of questionnaires/surveys you have conducted yourself; • Interviews or focus groups you have conducted; • Structured observations within an organisation – e.g. a place of part-time work; a voluntary group or an organisation for which you have previously worked. Secondary material • Financial, economic and statistical information (e.g. from EUROSTAT, World Bank, OECD, etc); • Written or multimedia documents whose independent existence can be verified: o Newspaper articles, advertisements, film, television, radio, videos, social media; o Official records and reports from companies, trade unions, professional associations, voluntary bodies, local and national government, independent research units and ‘think tanks’, industry fora and trade associations; o Published diaries, biographies and autobiographies, histories of organisations; o Historical/archived correspondence or internet content; o NEXIS database available via the library. In rare circumstances it may be feasible (but only with the full agreement of your dissertation supervisor) to conduct a totally theoretical dissertation – for instance on the philosophy of Business Ethics or the social theory of organisational analysis. Even with this 12 type of dissertation, it is usually wiser to relate relevant theoretical argument to empirical or practical issues, such as current debates on corporate governance or research methods. Ethics, risk and GDPR assessment The University has a duty of care to the human subjects of research carried out by students under its aegis and therefore needs to institute safeguards to ensure their interests are properly protected. In addition, the Business School needs to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and the protection of the University’s good name. You must not proceed with any empirical research until you have been granted ethics, risk and GDPR assessment approval by your supervisor. If you do not gain approval you cannot submit your dissertation. As soon as your supervisor has approved your forms (notified to you via email or through Canvas), you may begin. Until this time, you can of course be carrying out background reading on your topic or collecting publicly-available data e.g. published literature, company reports online etc. There is information about ethics, risk and GDPR available on Canvas to help you assess your dissertations appropriately. You must complete and upload each form to Turnitin by 10th May 2021 at the latest. DO NOT upload them until you have discussed them with your supervisor. Dissertation supervisors will review and approve your forms. Supervisors will not sign off on student projects until they are satisfied that the project is ethically sound, that the student understands the ethical issues involved and that the project is unlikely to cause harm to the students, research participants or the university’s reputation. Changing topics and/or methods It is very high risk to significantly change your topic and/or methods after the third group supervision. If you wish to do so, you must have a detailed discussion with your supervisor. It may be that you have to resubmit your ethics, risk and GDPR forms and if you do not do so, your final dissertation may not be a valid submission. 13 Module Structure Canvas: The learning, assessment and feedback on this module is supported by Canvas, and we advise you to familiarise yourself with the content of the module site as part of your independent study time. There are also links to library services, writing support, and lots of other useful supporting material. Independent study: The majority of work on this module is done by you independently. You are expected to prepare thoroughly for all supervision sessions. Over the course of this module, you will engage in 494 hours of independent study, which equates to about 16 hours per week over the 31 weeks from the start of the second semester to the submission deadline. Studying the material available on Canvas and in this document is an important starting point. Reading is a particularly important part of doing your dissertation as the current status of the knowledge base has to be established before a question can be posted/investigation embarked upon. Some introductory reading and source material can be found in the relevant links on Canvas. On this module you will be engaging in two types of reading: content reading and process reading. By content reading, we mean reading about the topics that you are studying and particularly the one you will do your dissertation on. You will be searching for and analysing academic work published in peer-reviewed academic journals, specialist research books and edited collections. In addition, you may also want to read about the chosen topic in more practitioner-focused publications such as Harvard Business Review, People Management, The Conversation and the like. By process reading, we mean reading about the conduct of research and your dissertation. Research methods textbooks and specialist journal articles will give you important insights into how to conduct an in-depth literature review and, more generally, how to plan, implement and manage your research dissertation. You may use foreign-language source material in support of your dissertation if relevant. However, you must be prepared to provide evidence of the source and a translated version. When referencing foreign language material where the information is written using another alphabet, such as Japanese, you should transliterate (not translate) the details into the English alphabet. You only need to put the transliteration in your reference list. Example: 鷲田清一. 2007. 京都の平熱 : 哲学者の都市案内. 東京: 講談社. Washida, K. 2007. Kyōto no heinetsu: tetsugakusha no toshi annai. Tōkyō: Kōdansha. Supervision: In total, you will receive to up to six hours of supervision, three group-based meetings which have been timetabled and up to three individual meetings. 14 Across Semester 2, you will have three timetabled supervision sessions. You are required to bring along preparatory notes and submit a piece of work before each session to your supervisor, who will provide you with formative feedback on work submitted. These timetabled sessions constitute the majority of supervision hours to which you are entitled; failure to prepare and/or attend could result in you losing out on dissertation support. Nonattendance at the timetabled supervision sessions without due notice will be followed up by the supervisor. Group supervision sessions will not be rescheduled (unless students have PEC). In addition, you are entitled to up to three individual meetings with your supervisor (generally scheduled over the summer months). You are expected to discuss the scheduling of these sessions (including staff unavailability and any advance notice required) with your supervisor. If you would like a meeting earlier than this, please ask your supervisor. All supervision sessions are your opportunity to ask any questions that you may have about your dissertation, so please do come prepared. While all activities seek to support your learning and overall progress, it is your responsibility to design and manage the dissertation independently. Your supervisor will offer support in the form of meetings, email contact, reading material as appropriate to your dissertation and negotiated with you in response to your individual research project. 3 hours will be timetabled, 3 hours are flexible surgery time to be arranged (email/Zoom/Teams) between you and your supervisor. Please remember that emails will count in the three hours of flexible surgery time. Please not that all supervision meetings will take place. 15 Detailed timetable Date Dec Activities Dissertation sign-up (via online form) Jan/Feb Supervisors allocation o Module leader to post supervisor allocation on Canvas Preparation for group supervision 1 o Students to prepare task 1: a one-page project outline to bring to the first supervision meeting (tentative research questions, key theoretical themes, research design) Week begins 14 Feb Supervision Meeting 1 (group)- Project outline o Students to informally present their one-page project outline (task 1) and receive feedback, as well as discuss plans going forward 21 Feb – 07 Mar Preparation for group supervision 2 o Students to prepare task 2: methodology plan (incl. ethics, risk and GDPR assessment) 07 Mar Deadline to submit task 2 to supervisors on Canvas Week begins 21 Mar Supervision Meeting 2 (group) – Methodology & Ethics/Risk/GDPR approval o Students to receive feedback on the task submitted and discuss their progress to date, as well as plans going forward 28 Mar – 20 Apr Preparation for group supervision 3 o Students to prepare task 3: literature plan / conceptual framework / hypotheses / research questions 20 Apr Deadline to submit task 3 to supervisors on Canvas Week begins 25 April Supervision Meeting 3 (group) – Literature review / conceptual framework / hypotheses/ research questions o Students to receive feedback on the task submitted and discuss their progress to date, as well as plans going forward 09 May Deadline to submit ethics, risk and GDPR forms (on Canvas) MayJune Preparation for individual supervision 4 o Once Semester 2 assessments are completed, students should work on their data set o Students to schedule meeting 4 o Students to submit a data set / emerging findings chapter one week in advance of meeting 16 June JuneJuly Supervision Meeting 4 (individual) – Data and emerging analysis (optional for students) o Students to receive feedback on the task submitted and discuss their progress to date, as well as plans going forward Preparation for individual supervision 5 o Students to schedule meeting 5 o Students to submit findings / discussion chapters one week in advance of meeting June July Supervision Meeting 5 (individual) – Findings and discussion (optional for students) o Students to receive feedback on the task submitted and discuss their progress to date, as well as plans going forward JulyAugust Preparation for individual supervision 6 o Students to schedule meeting 6 o Students to submit remaining chapters (introduction, conclusion, abstract, etc.) one week in advance of meeting July August Supervision Meeting 6 (individual) – Dissertation structure and writing up (optional for students) o Students to receive feedback on the task submitted and discuss their progress to date, as well as plans going forward 01 Sep, 4pm Submission deadline for the dissertation 17 Supervision Supervisor allocation A supervisor will be allocated to you on the basis of the Form you submit in December. In matching you with appropriate supervisors we will look for the best fit and availability of staff. Supervisor tasks Your dissertation supervisor’s task is to help you develop your research ideas and put them into practice in a fruitful manner, not to dictate a specific topic to you. In other words, they are here to guide and support your research, even though this may involve asking difficult questions about rationale, practicalities and contributions of your study – all of which will be aimed at making your research more robust. However, it is your research and ultimately you are responsible for designing, conducting and writing it. As a student you can expect from your supervisor: • • • • • • • Guidance on the design, management and execution of your dissertation. Guidance on the structure of your work. Staff to meet you at an arranged time. Comment on pieces of writing provided that you have submitted them by the specified date. Supervisors will only comment on ONE version of each document/chapter. Response to email communication within two working days (automatic replies are still a response). Tailored guidance specific to your dissertation, as well as generic guidance that will be applicable to most dissertations – this means that comparisons between one another may not be appropriate depending on the individual dissertations being undertaken. Provide you with their views of the progress you are making and what you need to pay attention to as you progress the work. In summary, the supervision sessions should be used to discuss your research, its progress and any questions with your supervisor as well as to get feedback on your progress. As a student you cannot expect your supervisor to: • • • • Give you a step by step plan for your dissertation. Provide you with reference materials. Read and comment on multiple drafts. Correct your English and/or edit your documents. 18 • • • • Predict a grade for your work in advance of submission – you MUST NOT ask them to do so. In keeping with the university assessment regulations staff are not allowed for any reason to indicate the mark a piece of assessed work is likely to receive. Give you instructions on how to achieve a certain grade – they CANNOT do this as your work is marked by two members of staff, plus potentially reviewed by an external examiner. Respond to emails outside of working hours (defined as Monday-Friday 8am-6pm). Read material sent to him/her after the dates specified (unless agreed otherwise). Please remember: your supervisor is your coach who will eventually be involved in grading your work; this can be a conflicting task. As a coach, your supervisor may be sympathetic towards your progress and your work attitude. As a grader, they may continue to believe that your work is not yet sufficient. Your supervisor is also your examiner and as such must restrict his/her input into your work. Please do not buy your supervisor gifts, s/he is unable to accept them. Supervision hours and content You are entitled to up to six hours of supervision from your supervisor, three of which have been timetabled and three of which will be arranged according to the needs of individual students. For both the group and individual supervision sessions, you are required to deliver your tasks, send the specified piece of writing to your supervisor by the specified deadline and can expect formative feedback before/during the supervision session. The three individual meetings are optional and can to be scheduled with your supervisor as meetings, email exchanges or as further written feedback on your work. If you would like feedback on specific pieces of writing during those sessions, you will need to submit formative tasks at least one week before the scheduled meeting. Managing supervision sessions You should take the initiative to manage the supervision sessions in such a way that you are setting and meeting the right milestones over the course of the module. You should maintain contact with your supervisor in between meetings as necessary and particularly when things are not going to plan – this is what your three hours of surgery sessions could help you with. If you notify your supervisor as soon as possible after encountering any problems, s/he can advise you on how to amend your research plan accordingly. So please be honest with them to enable them to help you. You must submit formative tasks as required (see detailed timetable) in order to receive feedback. 19 The University requires that students and supervisors maintain a record of formal contact meetings. Notes of the outcomes and action points from the formal contact meetings are to be kept by students and confirmed with supervisors. What do I do if I am unhappy with the supervision I receive? If you have any concerns about the structure and content of the supervision sessions or your supervisor’s advice, you should discuss these first with your supervisor. You should raise concerns as soon as you have them, rather than waiting to later in the dissertation process. Explain what you feel and what changes you would like to make for the process to help you achieve your potential. It is very important that you take the initiative on this, it is a skill that will be expected in the workplace. 20 Communication Canvas is one of the most important mechanisms by which we will communicate with you. On the site, you will find: • • • • Module information – including a copy of this module guide and staff details, Details about the assessment on this module (incl. a TurnItIn submission link), A link to the reading list, Links to other helpful resources. We will communicate with you via announcements on Canvas as well as with emails to your Newcastle email account. It is imperative that you check both Canvas and your University email account regularly. Module feedback This module will be evaluated using a questionnaire at the end of the academic year (August). We very much hope that you will take that opportunity to provide an opportunity for constructive feedback and a balanced assessment of your experiences of the module and the supervision received. In addition, we value your informal feedback over the course of this academic year to help us develop the module further. Rather than waiting for the next Student-Voice-Committee meeting or the evaluation questionnaire, I encourage you to come to talk to me about your experiences on the module. 21 Assessment Overview This module is assessed by a 10,000-word dissertation that answers the research question posed through a thorough review of the extant literature (academic journal articles, specialist books, edited collections), a methodology that explains your data collection and analysis, the findings/results of your research and a discussion of these in relation to the extant literature. Your dissertation should contain: • • • • • • • • • • An appropriate selection of sources using pre-defined search criteria; An analysis and evaluation of the academic literature; A synthesis of various academic perspectives while acknowledging ambiguity; Data collection and analysis; A good grasp of the implications of your analysis; A critical stance to the literature and your own analysis; An identification of implications for practice and appropriate conclusions; A set of arguments that are logically and coherently developed; Clarity of presentation; A fluent style. Word count The Dissertation should not exceed 10,000 words. Please note that the word limit is 10,000 words maximum, not 10,000 words +/- 10%. The word count includes the abstract and main text only. What is included in the word count? • • • • • In-text citations. For example, if you cite (Porter, 2006) this will be counted in Microsoft WORD and other word processing software as two words. You need to use appropriate in-text citations that are relevant and central to your argument and avoid those that are not. Headings and subheadings. Text in tables in the main part of the assignment. Text in JPEG or other text-based ‘pictures’ or PowerPoint slides inserted into your document. Generally, these sorts of devices are to be avoided and should only be used where they represent your OWN novel creation and are difficult to create in a word processing software. They should not be used if they are copied from other sources. Text in footnotes. What is excluded from the word count? • Title page, acknowledgements, tables of content and figures, statements of originality and consent. 22 • • • • The reference list. Appendices (e.g. tables, figures, interview transcripts). Tables that are composed mainly of numbers with words used to describe the column or row titles (for example, a table of financial performance, a table of market shares, a table of employee turnover). A diagram that portrays connections between ideas and contains no more than 20 words (e.g. a flow chart, an organization chart, a map showing key distribution nodes). Formatting Please adopt these formatting requirements for all written assignments: • • • • • • • Use 12-point font, such as Times New Roman or Calibri (but use 11-point for Ariel). Use standard margins (e.g. the default 1 inch or 2.54cm in WORD or another word processing software). Use 1.5 line spacing Number all pages consecutively in the Footer using the settings in WORD or another word processing software. Headings need to be clearly distinguished, you may wish to start each chapter on a new page, and you may want to consider numbering headings prefixed with the chapter number. Subheadings may also be numbered (e.g. 4.2, 4.2.1). Images may be used subject to appropriate permissions/acknowledgement of sources. Other formatting suggestions to improve the presentation of your work include: • Exceptions to 1.5 line spacing: § block quotes indented within the page; § the reference list at the end of your assignment using a ‘hanging indent’ in WORD or another word processing software; and § tables, charts or figures. • It is helpful for the reader if you use the Format function in WORD or another word processing software to set the line spacing with “0 pt before” and “0 pt after” (you may have to change the default settings for this). • Use a single line space between paragraphs. • Use the ‘insert page break’ function in WORD or another word processing software if you need to separate sections of your work onto different pages (e.g. for the reference list or any appendices). Referencing • • Ensure you use the Harvard Business Style of referencing (see http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/referencing/harvardatnewcastle) and that you follow the correct style for author, year, title, and either the book and publisher or the journal, volume and page numbers. Ensure your references are in alphabetical order. 23 • • • Do not use bullet points or numbers when creating your reference list. Ensure all sources you cite are included in the reference list (and that all items in the reference list are cited in your work). Consult a good referencing guide if in any doubt. Plagiarism • • • • • • The intellectual work of others that is being summarised in the dissertation must be attributed to its source. This includes material you yourself have published or submitted for assessment here or elsewhere. The university regulations do not allow you to submit the same piece of work twice in your degree. In your dissertation you need to show that you have expanded and improved the ideas from the proposal. You can also reference your own work in the same way that you would reference the work of any other scholar. An example of how to do this can be found here https://citethemrightonline.com/research/unpublished-or-confidentialinformation/students-own-work It is also plagiarism if you copy the work of another student. In that case both the plagiariser and the student who allows their work to be copied will be disciplined. When writing dissertations and essays, it is not sufficient to just indicate that you have used other people’s work by citing them in your list of references at the end. It is also not sufficient to just put “(Bloggs 1992)” at the end of a paragraph where you have copied someone else’s words. It is essential that the paragraph itself be IN YOUR OWN WORDS. The only exception to this is if you are quoting a source. In that case you must put the quotation in quotation marks and cite the source, including page reference, immediately afterwards. If the quotation is longer than a sentence, you should indent and set off the whole passage; when the quotation is indented in this way it is not necessary to use quotation marks, but, as always, the author, date, and page number should be cited. It is assumed that all ideas, opinions, conclusions, specific wording, quotations, conceptual structure and data, whether reproduced exactly or in paraphrase, which are not referenced to another source, is the work of the student on this dissertation. If this is not the case, an act of plagiarism may have occurred, which is cause for disciplinary action at the programme or University level. IT MAY LEAD TO DISMISSAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY. 24 Content and structure There follows an example of a common agreed structure for your dissertation – discuss with your supervisor any adaptations that will be appropriate for your work. This represents a summary of the sort of material that is included in each section. Title page (essential) Including the title of your dissertation, your name and student number, your degree course and the degree-awarding institution as well as the word count. The title should be succinct yet clearly specify its content and agreed as part of the final supervision meeting. Abstract (essential) Summarising your argument in no less than 75 words and no more than 300 words. Acknowledgements Recognising any help, advice and support that you have received. Contents page (essential) Detailing which chapter and section begins at which page. Make sure that the page numbers match throughout your work. Table of tables / Table of figures Detailing which tables / figures are in which chapter and on which page. Make sure that the page numbers match throughout your work. A statement of originality (essential) This should read: I hereby declare that this dissertation is my own work and contains no materials previously published or written by another person, except where due acknowledgement is made in the dissertation. This work, has not been submitted (either in whole or in substantial part) for any degree at this or any other academic or professional institution. Signed: …………………………… Date: ………………… A consent statement (essential) This should read: Either I consent to an anonymised version of this dissertation being shared (in part or whole) with future students for teaching purposes. Signed: …………………………… Date: ………………… Or I do not consent to this dissertation being shared (in part or whole) with future students for teaching purposes. Signed: …………………………… Date: ………………… 25 Chapter 1: Introduction This chapter introduces and contextualises your dissertation. A good introduction chapter will set out the significance and importance of the topic, provide a summary of the findings and implications, and explain how your dissertation is structured. Chapter 2: Literature review A literature review discusses published information in a particular subject area. It usually combines both summary and synthesis of existing academic research. A summary is a recap of the important information of the source, but a synthesis is a re-organization of that information, e.g. comparing and contrasting perspectives, tracing the intellectual progression of the field, including major debates, evaluating the sources according to relevance and importance for your research. The literature is a foundation and support for the new insight that you aim to contribute. Ideally a literature review will develop an argument that justifies your research question/issue/problem. Chapter 3: Methodology This chapter should first describe and briefly justify your overall research strategy, with reference to the research methods literature. In selecting a method you must ensure that it is appropriate to your research question. The specific data collection methods you employ – surveys, interviews, observation, analytical models – should clearly fit within the overall methodology. For instance, it would be inappropriate to adopt a qualitative interpretive methodology and then rely mainly on quantitative tools or SWOT analyses. You should clearly describe and justify the methods and tools you employ. Where there are constraints on the kind of investigation that you can conduct, you should acknowledge them. You should include samples of the data collection instruments you have used (e.g. copies of your questionnaire, the search terms used in any qualitative searches undertaken in NEXIS; examples of your coding frame; details of any data sets you have used; details of statistical analyses e.g. extracts from SPSS from which you have created summary tables, any factor analyses etc.) in the appendices, where appropriate. Chapter 4: Findings This chapter presents your analysis and synthesis in response to your research question(s). Be critical and analytical in your approach: be clear about areas of disagreement (in terms of view and/or research findings) and consider your findings in analytical categories (rather than mere description). You may want to consider the use of summary tables and figures to illustrate your argument. Please note that you may want to devise an appropriate title for this chapter. Chapter 5: Discussion This chapter interprets and discusses your findings in response to the ‘so what’ question – why is your analysis important and for whom? You should discuss how your findings support or challenge the theoretical / empirical context set out in the literature review. It also sets out the implications of your analysis for further study and, where appropriate, managers and/or policy-makers. Please discuss with your supervisor if this chapter might be more appropriately integrated in the findings or conclusion chapter. 26 Chapter 6: Conclusion This chapter summarises your findings in response to your research question(s) and their implications for future research and practice. The conclusion chapter is a prime opportunity to emphasise the contribution of your work and to consider how your findings relate back to any broader contextual issues raised in the introduction. Reference list (essential) This is not a bibliography, but a complete list of all the sources referred to in the main body of your dissertation. It should be set out using the Harvard at Newcastle Referencing System http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/referencing. We expect you to be proficient in referencing in your final year of study, but if you need any help please refer to Canvas and the Library website. (It is not a good use of your supervisor’s time answering referencing queries.) Appendices (where appropriate) It is perfectly fine not to include an appendix in your dissertation. In most cases, appendices are used inappropriately anyway, either as ‘dumping ground’ for superfluous material or with material that is essential to the understanding of the main argument. There may be instances, however, when it may be perfectly fine to include an appendix, and it is here that you should seek advice from your supervisor. 27 Submission Your dissertation is due at 4pm on Tuesday 1st September 2021. You must submit an electronic copy of your full dissertation via the TurnItIn link on the Canvas. You need to submit a WORD document, not a PDF. Penalties for Late Submission: It is your responsibility to hand in your dissertation by the due date. Any dissertations handed in after the date, without prior agreement of the School through the PEC process, will be penalised. Work submitted up to one week after the deadline will be marked at a maximum of 50%. Work submitted more than one week after the deadline will be awarded a mark of zero. In exceptional circumstances, such as illness, you may be able to request an extension to this deadline and/or appeal for mitigation in the marking of your work but such requests can only be made through the Personal Extenuating Circumstances (PEC) – neither your dissertation supervisor nor the DPD can approve an extension to the deadline. If you have any resit examinations or need to resubmit any coursework, you will automatically be granted an extension according to the following rubric: • • • 1 re-sit 2 re-sits 3 or more re-sits 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 28 Assessment criteria How Your Work is Marked The dissertation will be double marked by your Dissertation supervisor and one other member of the teaching/research staff. Double marking means that they mark the work separately, and then come to an agreed overall mark. In addition, a sample of dissertations will be read by an External Examiner. Although they will not generally have the right to alter your specific mark, they will be asked to validate the overall assessment of dissertations. Read the marking scheme (next page) carefully to understand the distinctions between the marking bands. 29 Marking scheme Grade Mark Structure and Coherence A substantial piece of work that demonstrates coherent arguments and lines of thought throughout the document. Selection and Application of Appropriate Research Methods An approach that illustrates a critical consideration of appropriate methods of data collection. It has excellent justification and is carried out with due care. Outstanding understanding of ethical issues with appropriate solutions consistent with University guidelines. Limitations of approach are explicit. Substantial and appropriate data collected. Critical Analysis and Conclusions Distinction 70 -84 A current and comprehensive review of the literature showing some critical insight using primarily journal based sources. A well-structured and coherent piece of work. An approach that illustrates consideration of appropriate methods of data collection. It has very good justification and is carried out with due care (excellent understanding of ethical issues). Limitations of approach are clear. Appropriate amount of data. A very detailed analysis and critical synthesis of literature and the findings leading to insightful conclusions. Writing style at a very high standard. Fully referenced to the requisite standard. Merit Have adhered to the structural guidelines and demonstrated good clear but limited arguments and rationale. An approach that, on the whole, illustrates that appropriate methods of data collection have been used. It has some justification and has probably been carried out with due care. Some limitations are noted. Appropriate data was collected. A detailed analysis with some critical evaluation of the findings and some thorough conclusions. Good writing style. Mainly referenced to the requisite standard. Minimal typing and grammatical errors. Distinction 85100 60-69 Use of Academic Literature A contribution to the subject literature through its critical insight. Demonstration of depth of reading incorporating ‘state of the art’ sources. Critical awareness of key theories and debates in the literature based upon a greater use of journal articles. Innovative approach to analysis and interpretation of results demonstrating critical insight consistent with the findings. It has valid and insightful conclusions that articulate a deep, critical understanding of the theories and approaches used. It advances understanding of key issues and problems. Writing and referencing Writing style is exemplary and at appropriate level. Fully referenced to the requisite standard. Minimal grammatical and typing errors. Grade Mark Use of Academic Literature Have presented the key theory in the subject area drawn predominantly from book / web sources. Lacks appropriate coverage of journal articles. Structure and Coherence Have adhered to the structural guidelines and have demonstrated some coherence of argument. Selection and Application of Appropriate Research Methods Have selected an appropriate method for data collection and articulated a clear but limited rationale for its adoption. Acceptable understanding of ethical issues with appropriate solutions consistent with University guidelines. Some appropriate data collected. Critical Analysis and Conclusions Pass 50-59 Fail 40-49 A flawed piece of work. Significant omissions from theory and/or review based upon few sources. Guidelines not really followed with little structure or argument throughout the document. Appropriate method used with some care but with little justification. Methodological and procedural flaws are evident. Inadequate understanding of ethical issues and / or research inconsistent with University guidelines. Little useful data was collected. Flawed analysis and fails to draw any logical conclusions. The writing style is poor. Not referenced to the requisite standard. Inadequate proofreading. Fail

CLICK HERE TO GET A PROFESSIONAL WRITER TO WORK ON THIS PAPER AND OTHER SIMILAR PAPERS

CLICK THE BUTTON TO MAKE YOUR ORDER

error: Content is protected !!